Sunday, October 12, 2014

RAYTOWN'S LEADING NEWS SOURCE



How about  them Royals!!!

BY GREG WALTERS
Now that the Kansas City Royals  are the American League Champions I'd like to see a re-match with St. Louis. I want the world to see the Royals can win without Don Denkinger at first base.

Remember Denkinger?

He was the umpire at first base in Game Six who blew a call which many credited opening the door to a rally by the Royals to win the game.

The aftermath in Game 7 was evident.

As crew chief of the 1985 World Series umpiring unit, Denkinger was scheduled to work behind home plate in Game 7, a fact that further upset the Cardinals and manager Whitey Herzog. Some observers suggested that the presence of Denkinger behind the plate affected the Cardinals' gameplay, as ace pitcher John Tudor got off to a terrible start, giving up five earned runs and four walks in only 2 1⁄3 innings. Tudor was so disgusted by his performance, that he subsequently punched an electrical fan with his pitching hand. Todd Worrell (while being interviewed on ESPN Classic's The Top 5 Reasons You Can't Blame... about Don Denkinger's involvement in the 1985 World Series) would later compare the idea of Don Denkinger working behind home plate to putting a stick of dynamite back there and lighting it.

The Cardinals made their frustrations clear throughout the game. ABC television cameras caught Herzog screaming and belittling Denkinger from the Cardinals' dugout throughout the contest. Pitcher Joaquín Andújar exploded twice over Denkinger's calls at the plate during the 5th inning, finally being ejected with Herzog after a heated argument over Denkinger's strike zone. Herzog even went so far as to directly tell Denkinger that had he gotten "the call" right in Game 6, the Cardinals would not have been subjected to a seventh game in the first place. (Denkinger then replied that if the Cardinals were batting better than .120 in the Series, there would have been no need for a Game 7 either.) In the immediate aftermath of his meltdown, Andújar smashed a toilet in the Cardinals' clubhouse. The Cardinals were completely demolished by the Royals as Kansas City would go on to win Game 7 in an 11–0 blowout, taking home their first and only World Series Trophy.

That was then. This is now.

The Royals are making baseball history. Their eight game post season winning streak is proof of their pitching and defensive strength. Their run production may be low -- but they have shown an uncanny knack of scoring just enough to win the contests they are in.

Their confidence is growing.

Whether they play St. Louis or San Francisco is yet to be seen. (San Francisco leads that series 3 to 1).

I am a Missouri boy through and through -- the rematch between the Royals and Cardinals  would be epic.


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and now the pitcher holds the ball, and now he lets it go . . .
Another friend came by Saturday night to watch the game. "Did someone mention something about October?" asked "Frank" of Halloween fame, when he stopped in to show support of the Royals. Even our dog, Wickett, decided it was time to join in the fun.



Baseball, Predictions,
and Casey at the Bat
It is all about baseball this week. More significantly, it is all about Royals Baseball and what is proving to be a post season for the record books.

The Royals playing in post season is not the same team that played in most of the regular season. They have been transformed into a well disciplined group of players all coming to the top of their game at the right moment. Consider the following trivia about this amazing transition that is the Kansas City Royals post season baseball team.

Baseball seasons come and baseball seasons go -- but this years post season play has already set records that were unthinkable before the beginning of the series. Consider the following:
  • A third baseman who flirted with batting below the Mendoza* line and was sent back to the minor leagues before the All Star Break is now leading both the National and American League in homeruns. Mike Moustakas is that player. He is the Royals’ third baseman. He bats ninth in the lineup. Traditionally, the ninth batter is reserved for your weakest hitter. In the space of just six games Moustakas has become a threat so strong at the plate I would not be surprised to see pitchers intentionally walk him before the series ends.
  • The Kansas City Royals outfielders have redefined the word defense. This evening I watched as the broadcaster said a ball was smashed into the gap between right and center field. Miraculously, Royals centerfielder Lorenzo Cain, came out of nowhere to make another diving catch reminiscent of something from the Disney Classic (movie) “Angels in the Outfield”. Each game has had trademark catches by the Royals outfielders, literally robbing opposing teams of victory. As one announcer opined, “the ball, if hit in the air, is not allowed to touch the grass” when the Royals are on defense.
  • Billy Butler stole second base! There are some truisms in his life. Things like water is wet, ice forms at 32 degrees, the sun rises in the east. You can add to the list, Billy Butler is one of the slowest, if not the slowest runner in the game. Butler is the Royals Designated Hitter. His bat has suddenly come alive this series with some game winning clutch hitting. He can play a decent first base if needed. His stolen base (which I bet he kept) is as close as you will ever see divine intervention take place on a ball diamond.  
  • The Royals came into the series known as a team that plays “small ball” (they were last in hitting homeruns in the regular season) relying upon bunts, base running to win games. In the post season they have not abandoned the small ball concept, but have added to it with stellar defense, strong pitching and, get this . . . . the long ball! They lead ALL of the teams, both National and American League in homerun production in post season play.
  • Five of the Royals six victories in post season play have been played into extra innings or to the ninth inning as tied games. It as if the Royals do not know how to lose.
Put all of the above together with what has got to be the most versatile pitching staff in the game and you have a team that may go all the way this year. If you have not been watching the series, kick back and take a few minutes to do so.

* Mendoza Line is an expression in baseball derived from the name of shortstop player Mario Mendoza, whose batting average is taken to define the threshold of incompetent hitting. The cutoff point is most often said to be .200.

PREDICTIONS:
Paul Livius: “The Royals will win the American League Pennant in five games against the Orioles.”

Garth Bare: “The Royals in six against Baltimore. Wait and see who the National League Champion is before making that prediction."

Greg Walters: “I don’t want to jinx the Royals by making a prediction. At the same time – I do expect to see the Royals and Cardinals battle it out for the Major League Pennant this year.”

Cousin Phil Seidl: (who lives in Cedar Rapids, Iowa but has always been Orioles fan): “Baltimore in seven – just you watch!” Phil and I have a side bet on the American League series. If the Orioles win, he wins a case of Boulevard Beer. If the Royals win, I win a case of Glueck Beer (which was once bottled in Cedar Rapids). I’ve tasted Glueck Beer – I wonder if it is really supposed to taste like the can? Somehow I feel I lose even if I win this bet.)
Want to add your prediction to the list? Send it to the Raytown Report Blog and we will add it to the list.


Casey at the Bat
The following link is to a dramatic reading of Casey at the Bat by Orlando Sentinel sports columnist Mike Bianchi of Ernest Thayer's baseball classic, "Casey at the Bat," which was first was published 127 years ago.

USE THIS LINK CASEY AT THE BAT

The Outlook wasn't brilliant for the Mudville nine that day:
The score stood four to two, with but one inning more to play.
And then when Cooney died at first, and Barrows did the same,
A sickly silence fell upon the patrons of the game.


A straggling few got up to go in deep despair. The rest
Clung to that hope which springs eternal in the human breast;
They thought, if only Casey could get but a whack at that -
We'd put up even money, now, with Casey at the bat.


But Flynn preceded Casey, as did also Jimmy Blake,
And the former was a lulu and the latter was a cake;
So upon that stricken multitude grim melancholy sat,
For there seemed but little chance of Casey's getting to the bat.


But Flynn let drive a single, to the wonderment of all,
And Blake, the much despis-ed, tore the cover off the ball;
And when the dust had lifted, and the men saw what had occurred,
There was Jimmy safe at second and Flynn a-hugging third.


Then from 5,000 throats and more there rose a lusty yell;
It rumbled through the valley, it rattled in the dell;
It knocked upon the mountain and recoiled upon the flat,
For Casey, mighty Casey, was advancing to the bat.


There was ease in Casey's manner as he stepped into his place;
There was pride in Casey's bearing and a smile on Casey's face.
And when, responding to the cheers, he lightly doffed his hat,
No stranger in the crowd could doubt 'twas Casey at the bat.


Ten thousand eyes were on him as he rubbed his hands with dirt;
Five thousand tongues applauded when he wiped them on his shirt.
Then while the writhing pitcher ground the ball into his hip,
Defiance gleamed in Casey's eye, a sneer curled Casey's lip.


And now the leather-covered sphere came hurtling through the air,
And Casey stood a-watching it in haughty grandeur there.
Close by the sturdy batsman the ball unheeded sped-
"That ain't my style," said Casey. "Strike one," the umpire said.


From the benches, black with people, there went up a muffled roar,
Like the beating of the storm-waves on a stern and distant shore.
"Kill him! Kill the umpire!" shouted someone on the stand;
And its likely they'd a-killed him had not Casey raised his hand.


With a smile of Christian charity great Casey's visage shone;
He stilled the rising tumult; he bade the game go on;
He signaled to the pitcher, and once more the spheroid flew;
But Casey still ignored it, and the umpire said, "Strike two."


"Fraud!" cried the maddened thousands, and echo answered fraud;
But one scornful look from Casey and the audience was awed.
They saw his face grow stern and cold, they saw his muscles strain,
And they knew that Casey wouldn't let that ball go by again.


The sneer is gone from Casey's lip, his teeth are clenched in hate;
He pounds with cruel violence his bat upon the plate.
And now the pitcher holds the ball, and now he lets it go,
And now the air is shattered by the force of Casey's blow.


Oh, somewhere in this favored land the sun is shining bright;
The band is playing somewhere, and somewhere hearts are light,
And somewhere men are laughing, and somewhere children shout;
But there is no joy in Mudville - mighty Casey has struck out.


BY PAUL LIVIUS

The Paul Livius Report
Raytown Board of Aldermen Meeting – October 7, 2014

Police Chief Jim Lynch presented R.E.A.P. with a check for $10,700 from the Raytown Police Benefit Organization.

The Paul Livius Report
Shirley Whitman went before the Board and said she talked with Dr. Markley.  She asked why the test scores had dropped so dramatically.  She was told the students were tested using the “Common Core” method of teaching, but the students had been prepared using the old curriculum.  She also attended the Chamber of Commerce luncheon.  She said she had submitted her application to volunteer to help students with math, reading, and Social Studies.

The Board passed a resolution to approve  the Speed and Crash Reduction/Hazardous Moving Grant Contract from the Missouri Department of Transportation Highway Safety. The City intends to use these funds to decrease hazardous violation and speed related accidents. The grant contract allows for up to $11,850.00 dollars in reimbursable grant funds for overtime enforcement and to send one person to the annual LETSAC conference.

Mahesh Sharma told the Board some of the highlights in the past year are:
- P-25 radio project completed in compliance with FCC regulations
- Introduction of a new Professional Development Plan for police officers
- Achieved A+ S&P Bond Rating
- Installation of Google Fiber throughout the City
- Continued success with Mental Health Court
- Completed demolition of two dangerous buildings
- Installation and implementation of new financial software
- Completed renovations of tennis courts at Colman-Livengood Park
- Completed construction of communication radio tower
- Froze Police Officers Pension Plan to join a more sustainable Missouri LAGERS Plan
- Implementation of a new 401(a) Plan for employees
- Successful Tuition Reimbursement Program for employees
- Completed City’s first ever full Codification project
- Citizen communication via Electronic Newsletter and Social Media

Mahesh Sharma said employees are the core strength of any organization. As the City Administrator, it is his role to ensure that the City takes care of this asset by providing the best working environment. Starting November 1, 2013, a new 401(a) plan was introduced to all employees to promote a healthy retirement and an effort towards better employee retention.  The City is losing the talent pool to neighboring communities due to a wage gap.  He is recommending a four percent across the board pay increase.  This increase applies to all full-time and regular part-time employees excluding seasonal employees. It also excludes the employees of the Police Department who are receiving no less than a four percent pay adjustment under their new Professional Development Plan. The employees who are under probation as of November 1, 2014 will receive an increase after the completion of their probationary employment period.  This is the fourth year in a row that he is recommending the no sewer rate increase.  Services are provided by our certified EMS Staff at no cost to our residents. Public Safety Employees are deeply committed to assisting residents and businesses alike. The Police Department has established a Crisis Intervention Team (CIT) to assist mentally ill and distressed persons.  In summary, the proposed budget totals $28,265,083 for all funds excluding the Park Fund. The budget for the General Fund, the City’s primary operating fund, is $13,589,391— an increase of approximately two percent or $259,204.  For more information on the new budget, go to http://www.raytown.mo.us/vertical/sites/%7B418C71C3-E397-4C87-B464-C498EC8900F9%7D/uploads/10-07-14_Web_Packet.pdf.  The budget information starts on page 31.  Alderman Ertz moved and the Board passed the motion to approve the budget without the Parks Board budget.  The Park Board will be meeting and there is no reason to approve the Parks Board budget until a decision is made about the future of Super Splash.

The Board passed a resolution for the expense for the Development Department Renovations by the Wilson Group.  Andy Noll told the Board this is necessary to improve customer service and to use the Department space more efficiently.  The remodel will remove a wall to allow visual access to the front counter for additional staff members, reorganize the staff area to make filing more efficient and utilize the Department space more efficiently, and a door will be moved away from the main fee counter so that Department staff will not be visible to the customers at the fee counter. The renovation costs will be $26,872.90, with a 5% contingency fee for the project.

The Board passed an ordinance to change the Property Tax levy rate.  Tom Cole told the Board there is a need to amend Ordinance No. 5501-14 which was approved by the Board of Aldermen on September 16, 2014 due to the fact that the City received final numbers from the County on September 18, 2014. Finance has recalculated the levy rates using the formula supplied by the State Auditor's Office. These calculations indicated the final levy rate of $0.3671 per $100.00 assessed valuation for general city operations and a rate of $0.1838 per $100.00 assessed valuation for park operations. The 2014 final rates represent a net decrease of $0.0020 from 2013 and a decrease of $0.0066 of what was approved on September 16, 2014 by the Board of Aldermen.

BY KAREN
FIT BOTTOMED EATS
Buttermilk Oven
Fried Chicken
My last When In Rome post made us realize that comfort food doesn’t necessarily have to be congruent with heavy, greasy, “I need to take a nap” food. I’ve often wondered how eating something that sits like a rock in your belly and makes you feel like hell afterward was ever awarded the nickname comfort to begin with. READ MORE


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27 comments:

Anonymous said...

I am so angry I could spit. They just put all this tar and ground up rock on our street but did NOTHING to the areas it covered to repair the large cracks and missing layers of asphalt before putting it down. Now we have a permanent bumpy street in its place. Can't they do anything right up at City Hall?!?

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the baseball news. It went well with my morning coffee!

Anonymous said...

The sheepole need to change the makeup if the Board at the next election.

If Department Heads were required to live in the City of Raytown, the department heads may resign and be replaced.

Living conditions in Raytown are deplorable. I can certainty understand why Department Heads refuse to move here.

Aaron said...

They don't care if the streets are bumpy. The Public Works guy has left the building. No one has been hired to take his place. None of the department heads live in the city, so they don't see the problems they cause. We need a new city council to make and enforce the laws that will benefit the tax payers, not the talkig heads.

Anonymous said...

CASEY'S REVENGE
by Grantland Rice

There were saddened hearts in Mudville for a week or even more;
There were muttered oaths and curses- every fan in town was sore.

"Just think," said one, "how soft it looked with Casey at the bat,
And then to think he'd go and spring a bush league trick like that!"

All his past fame was forgotten- he was now a hopeless "shine."
They called him "Strike-Out Casey," from the mayor down the line;

And as he came to bat each day his bosom heaved a sigh,
While a look of hopeless fury shone in mighty Casey's eye.

He pondered in the days gone by that he had been their king,
That when he strolled up to the plate they made the welkin ring;

But now his nerve had vanished, for when he heard them hoot
He "fanned" or "popped out" daily, like some minor league recruit.

He soon began to sulk and loaf, his batting eye went lame;
No home runs on the score card now were chalked against his name;

The fans without exception gave the manager no peace,
For one and all kept clamoring for Casey's quick release.

The Mudville squad began to slump, the team was in the air;
Their playing went from bad to worse - nobody seemed to care.

"Back to the woods with Casey!" was the cry from Rooters' Row.
"Get some one who can hit the ball, and let that big dub go!"

The lane is long, some one has said, that never turns again,
And Fate, though fickle, often gives another chance to men;

And Casey smiled; his rugged face no longer wore a frown-
The pitcher who had started all the trouble came to town.

All Mudville had assembled - ten thousand fans had come
To see the twirler who had put big Casey on the bum;

And when he stepped into the box, the multitude went wild;
He doffed his cap in proud disdain, but Casey only smiled.

"Play ball!" the umpire's voice rang out, and then the game began.
But in that throng of thousands there was not a single fan

Who thought that Mudville had a chance, and with the setting sun
Their hopes sank low- the rival team was leading "four to one."

The last half of the ninth came round, with no change in the score;
But when the first man up hit safe, the crowd began to roar;

Anonymous said...

The din increased, the echo of ten thousand shouts was heard
When the pitcher hit the second and gave "four balls" to the third.

Three men on base - nobody out - three runs to tie the game!
A triple meant the highest niche in Mudville's hall of fame;

But here the rally ended and the gloom was deep as night,
When the fourth one "fouled to catcher" and the fifth "flew out to right."

A dismal groan in chorus came; a scowl was on each face
When Casey walked up, bat in hand, and slowly took his place;

His bloodshot eyes in fury gleamed, his teeth were clenched in hate;
He gave his cap a vicious hook and pounded on the plate.

But fame is fleeting as the wind and glory fades away;
There were no wild and woolly cheers, no glad acclaim this day;

They hissed and groaned and hooted as they clamored: "Strike him out!"
But Casey gave no outward sign that he had heard this shout.

The pitcher smiled and cut one loose - across the plate it sped;
Another hiss, another groan. "Strike one!" the umpire said.

Zip! Like a shot the second curve broke just below the knee.
"Strike two!" the umpire roared aloud; but Casey made no plea.

No roasting for the umpire now - his was an easy lot;
But here the pitcher whirled again- was that a rifle shot?

A whack, a crack, and out through the space the leather pellet flew,
A blot against the distant sky, a speck against the blue.

Above the fence in center field in rapid whirling flight
The sphere sailed on - the blot grew dim and then was lost to sight.

Ten thousand hats were thrown in air, ten thousand threw a fit,
But no one ever found the ball that mighty Casey hit.

O, somewhere in this favored land dark clouds may hide the sun,
And somewhere bands no longer play and children have no fun!

And somewhere over blighted lives there hangs a heavy pall,
But Mudville hearts are happy now, for Casey hit the ball.

Anonymous said...

If you don't like Raytown move out you won't be missed!!! Can I help you pack???

Anonymous said...

I would, but you and the others at city hall have mismanaged things so bad my property is only worth about half of what it was when I moved here 25 years ago.

Andy Whiteman said...

8:56 AM, You seem to think moving is easy and simple when in fact it is a very time consuming and expensive process. Are you willing to help with expenses?

I moved because of excessive heat and excessive cold, not the mismanagement by elected city and school officials. It took me 6 years to find a suitable location and house and another 4 years to remodel the house, pack and move. The expense was over $100,000. Since I am disabled, it takes me longer than it does a normal person, but even for a normal person, there is still time and expensive (down payment, closing costs, mover's charges, etc.)

When my I expect your check?

Andy Whiteman

Anonymous said...

We are moving the middle of November. BTW, we are adding another rental property for the city to 'manage'...I can actually rent my house more than what it is worth.
Hedges

Anonymous said...

If you can't or won't move then quit bad mouthing the city. You are doing more harm than good.

Anonymous said...

I went to the open house for the Raytown Fire Protection District last Saturday. I am a somewhat "former" fire buff, as I have not been out for several years now. I have not even been to Station 1 since they had remolded it years ago. I was given a guided tour of the station, and I have to say that is fairly nice. I was talking to the one who gave us the tour, and told him that even though I understand why the numbers where changed (to P-51, P-52, T/L-52 etc...) that it still leaves a bad taste in my mouth, as those are "our" rigs, and not the KCFD's. I also asked how is the automatic aid working out, and granted it is a little give and take, but I found out that Raytown Station 2 (P-52 and T/L-52) are now one of the KCFD's busiest stations. Also, many of the rank and file are not happy over the situation either. While it might have seemed like a good idea at the time, I am not sure about the out come, in some ways I think the KCFD is perhaps taking advantage of the RFPD. However, as I said it works both ways, as P-43 (Knobtown Station) is now running more into the eastern parts of the city. There is good and bad, but in the end I think the we are getting the short end of the stick.

Greg Walters said...

I live in Raytown and I like living here. It is very conveniently located in the middle of the city and easy to get to.

It only takes me about 15 minutes to get to and from the office in Downtown Kansas City For a city as large as KC that is fantastic.

I have very good neighbors who take excellent care of there property. We watch out for each other, get together at least once a year for a block party sometimes more frequently.

Good people, good times . . . guess I am lucky.



Pat Casady said...

I don’t believe it is a matter of not liking
Raytown. I think it is more a matter of the way
Raytown is being run and run down by the powers
that be.
I talk to a lot of people at my business and most of
them and I still love our town. What we are not happy
with is the way tax dollars were promised to be used
and the way they are being used.
“Anonymous” 8:56, you can’t really say you are happy
with our streets can you? Raytown taxpayers several
years ago voted for tax increases that promised street
overlays with asphalt. It never happened other than
a few yards on 63rd st. Are you happy with the tax
giveaways? This takes away from improvements that
would or could make Raytown more desirable good
people and or new businesses.
It’s not a matter of love it or leave it. It’s a matter of
how this town is run by our leaders. So far the story
isn’t all that good.
Raytown is short on policemen, our streets are terrible
our parks aren’t the safest and codes aren’t enforced
like they should be. These all take money to work.
But hey, the out of town City Administrator got his
raise and didn’t have to move to Raytown as he promised.
City Hall is getting renovated, what more could you ask for.
In your eyes everything is great. Really?

Anonymous said...

Anon 6:15 pm
I'm not the one doing harm to the city. You and your cohorts at city hall with your failed policies are harming Raytown. Oil and gravel instead of asphalt, Super Splash closed due to lack of maintenance, not enough police officers on the streets. These are the things hurting Raytown.

Andy Whiteman said...

6:15 PM, No one is badmouthing the city! The posters are bringing up specific issues that are handled poorly or not at all by elected officials and Department Heads. If I go to a business and am dissatisfied, I make my complaint known. Don't you do the same? Thw city should be run as a business since they use the sheepole's Tax $$$$$$$!

BTW Pat, The CA NEVER received a raise. I was told that the $30K was an adjustment to bring is salary in line with other cities so he wouldn't leave. In my opinion, his residency requirement should be brought in line with other cities! The last 2 times postage went up it was an adjustment not a raise. These are outright lies by using different words.

Andy Whiteman

KMCCLA said...

Greg, I would agree. As I have lived here all my life -- 45 years. My father moved here (from Kansas City) in 1952, and has lived here ever since as well. Thirty-five some odd years ago, when my grandparents house was bought out to build the shopping center there at 66th and Raytown Road, (they lived at the "old" 6701 Raytown Rd, or about 66th Terr) they looked all over, but ended up a few blocks away on 69th St. I like it here, it is for me -- home. We are fairly close to everything. A short drive the Truman Sports Complex, or a short drive to Downtown KC. The airport is 45 minutes away, as is the Speedway. As for my commute -- I work in Lee's Summit -- is also about a 15 minute drive. My neighborhood is fairly quiet, about the only time we see the police is if they are doing radar (which we wish they would do more of). While we are not as close to our neighbors as we use too be, we have met, and do look out for each other. The guy across the street shovels our driveway in the winter, so my father -- or myself -- does not have too. People like to complain about various things, but many are unwilling to do anything about it. Raytown may have it faults and failings, but no town is perfect. But to those who wish to complain, do something. Put-up or shut-up. If you are not part of the solution, either you are part of the problem, or you have no right to complain if you are not part of the solution.

Greg Walters said...

Now that the Kansas City Royals are the American League Champions I'd like to see a re-match with St. Louis. I want the world to see the Royals can win without Don Denkinger at first base.

Remember Denkinger?

He was the umpire at first base in Game Six who blew a call which many credited opening the door to a rally by the Royals to win the game.

The aftermath in Game 7 was evident.

As crew chief of the 1985 World Series umpiring unit, Denkinger was scheduled to work behind home plate in Game 7, a fact that further upset the Cardinals and manager Whitey Herzog. Some observers suggested that the presence of Denkinger behind the plate affected the Cardinals' gameplay, as ace pitcher John Tudor got off to a terrible start, giving up five earned runs and four walks in only 2 1⁄3 innings. Tudor was so disgusted by his performance, that he subsequently punched an electrical fan with his pitching hand. Todd Worrell (while being interviewed on ESPN Classic's The Top 5 Reasons You Can't Blame... about Don Denkinger's involvement in the 1985 World Series) would later compare the idea of Don Denkinger working behind home plate to putting a stick of dynamite back there and lighting it.

The Cardinals made their frustrations clear throughout the game. ABC television cameras caught Herzog screaming and belittling Denkinger from the Cardinals' dugout throughout the contest. Pitcher Joaquín Andújar exploded twice over Denkinger's calls at the plate during the 5th inning, finally being ejected with Herzog after a heated argument over Denkinger's strike zone. Herzog even went so far as to directly tell Denkinger that had he gotten "the call" right in Game 6, the Cardinals would not have been subjected to a seventh game in the first place. (Denkinger then replied that if the Cardinals were batting better than .120 in the Series, there would have been no need for a Game 7 either.) In the immediate aftermath of his meltdown, Andújar smashed a toilet in the Cardinals' clubhouse. The Cardinals were completely demolished by the Royals as Kansas City would go on to win Game 7 in an 11–0 blowout, taking home their first and only World Series Trophy.

That was then. This is now.

The Royals are making baseball history. Their nine game post season winning streak is proof of their pitching and defensive strength. Their run production may be low -- but they have shown an uncanny knack of scoring just enough to win the contests they are in.

Their confidence is growing.

Whether they play St. Louis or San Francisco is yet to be seen. (San Francisco leads that series 3 to 1).

I am a Missouri boy through and through -- the rematch between the Royals and Cardinals would be epic.

Anonymous said...

You guys are so misinformed about the streets it makes me laugh. Lee's Summit and now Overland Park are also using the lightweight aggregate seal. You all want to do things like they did in the 40's and 50's. As for the police department call Chief Lynch and ask him why he hasn't hired more officers he gets the money from the safety sales tax, and for Super Splash ask the Park Board why things are not kept up. And why don't you get off your lazy back side and run for some of these city offices, instead of just bi------ all the time????

John said...

Greg - you said the Royals made MLB history with the 9 post season games. We played the Wild Card game, three games for the division and four games for the league. Even using Dr. Markley's Core Curriculum, I only get 8 games. Which one did I miss?

Kelly said...

You’re right. Lee’s Summit and Overland Park are using oil and gravel. The difference is they fix the holes and bumps in the streets before putting down the oil and gravel. Raytown can’t because the roads are like wash boards. They’re not smooth like Lee’s Summit. I asked Chief Lynch about a year ago why there weren’t more police officers on the streets. He said the extra money from the safety sales tax goes to the Walmart TIF bonds. Two (or three) years ago, before the management company was hired, Alderman Aziere questioned Mr. Boji about the filters in the pools. The alderman was told the filters were too expensive from the company they had always bought them from. When asked, he admitted he hadn’t looked at any other company to furnish the filters. I don’t remember if the filters were bought that year or not. I do remember Alderman Aziere was very put out with Mr. Boji. We are not stupid, we are not misinformed and we are not lazy. Some of us have stepped up and ran for some of these city offices. They are Jason Greene, Josh Greene, and Janet Emerson. Look for more next year.

GADSDEN said...

Well let us see, (Sack & Save) the new grocery store at 350 and 75th St. I would think that it will be competition against the new Wal-Mart Grocery set to open ????

Also War-Mart is hurting right now not like we think of hurting but their profit will not be quite as many millions. So maybe the 350 store will close as someone rumored. Goes along with this coming Jan 1 they will cause about 30,000 of their employees that are part time to lose their group medical ins.

Let us see Ms Melson who just love Wal-mart might be upset since she has such an affair with them. She always has said that they make a living wgee

Wal-Mart is not good for us put the dam store in the inter city where they expect to draw the most of their customers from.

Greg Walters said...

Now that the Kansas City Royals are the American League Champions I'd like to see a re-match with St. Louis. I want the world to see the Royals can win without Don Denkinger at first base.

Remember Denkinger?

He was the umpire at first base in Game Six who blew a call which many credited opening the door to a rally by the Royals to win the game.

The aftermath in Game 7 was evident.

As crew chief of the 1985 World Series umpiring unit, Denkinger was scheduled to work behind home plate in Game 7, a fact that further upset the Cardinals and manager Whitey Herzog. Some observers suggested that the presence of Denkinger behind the plate affected the Cardinals' gameplay, as ace pitcher John Tudor got off to a terrible start, giving up five earned runs and four walks in only 2 1⁄3 innings. Tudor was so disgusted by his performance, that he subsequently punched an electrical fan with his pitching hand. Todd Worrell (while being interviewed on ESPN Classic's The Top 5 Reasons You Can't Blame... about Don Denkinger's involvement in the 1985 World Series) would later compare the idea of Don Denkinger working behind home plate to putting a stick of dynamite back there and lighting it.

The Cardinals made their frustrations clear throughout the game. ABC television cameras caught Herzog screaming and belittling Denkinger from the Cardinals' dugout throughout the contest. Pitcher Joaquín Andújar exploded twice over Denkinger's calls at the plate during the 5th inning, finally being ejected with Herzog after a heated argument over Denkinger's strike zone. Herzog even went so far as to directly tell Denkinger that had he gotten "the call" right in Game 6, the Cardinals would not have been subjected to a seventh game in the first place. (Denkinger then replied that if the Cardinals were batting better than .120 in the Series, there would have been no need for a Game 7 either.) In the immediate aftermath of his meltdown, Andújar smashed a toilet in the Cardinals' clubhouse. The Cardinals were completely demolished by the Royals as Kansas City would go on to win Game 7 in an 11–0 blowout, taking home their first and only World Series Trophy.

That was then. This is now.

The Royals are making baseball history. Their eight game post season winning streak is proof of their pitching and defensive strength. Their run production may be low -- but they have shown an uncanny knack of scoring just enough to win the contests they are in.

Their confidence is growing.

Whether they play St. Louis or San Francisco is yet to be seen. (San Francisco leads that series 3 to 1).

I am a Missouri boy through and through -- the rematch between the Royals and Cardinals would be epic.

Greg Walters said...

John,

You are so right. I did type in nine games instead of eight. But look at the bright side. Thanks to your vigilance, I have corrected the typo and put in the correct number eight!

Apologies for the mistake.

Anonymous said...

We need Aziere and Creamer replaced on this Board. I am amazed how people of such low regard for the citizens of this community and their opinions got elected in the first place.

Anonymous said...

There is something rotten in the parks department. One minute they have money the next minute they are broke, We need an audit.

Andy Whiteman said...

8:31PM, I am amazed how people of such low regard for the citizens of this community and their opinions get reelected time after time! I think it may be because fewer than 20% of registered voters vote in city elections. Fool me once shame on you. Fool me again shame on me.

Andy Whiteman