Sunday, December 9, 2018


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Filing Period for Mayor,
Board of Aldermen Opens
BY GREG WALTERS
Tuesday, December 11th, marks the opening of the filing period for those interested in seeking either the Mayor or a seat on the Board of Aldermen. The Mayor and one-half of the Board of Aldermen (five seats) are up for election this year. Winners of the election to be held on April 6th will serve a four year term.

The filing period will remain open until early January, 2019.
Here is a quick rundown of all requirements for the positions of Mayor and Board of Aldermen.

QUALIFICATIONS
Candidates must be an American citizen, registered to vote and have all of their taxes paid in full.

MAYOR
$1,000.00 per month plus a car allowance of $200 per month. The mayor is eligible to participate in the city’s group health care plan for employees. Filing fee for the office of Mayor is $50. Or, candidates can file by petition. To file by petition contact the City Clerk, Teresa Henry, at Raytown City Hall (737-6004).

ALDERMAN
$400.00 per month plus a car allowance of $50.00 per month. Members of the Board of Aldermen are eligible to participate in the city’s group health care plan. Filing fee for the office of Alderman is $25. Or, candidates can file by petition. To file by petition contact the City Clerk, Teresa Henry, at Raytown City Hall (737-6004).

CITY COLLECTOR
The Board of Aldermen recently voted to combine the office of City Collector with that of the City Marshal effective in 2021. The City Collector position pays  $1.00 per year for the next two years. At which time it will be combined with the office of City Marshal. The City Collector is eligible to participate in the city’s group health care plan. Filing fee for the office of City Collector is $50. Or, candidates can file by petition. To file by petition contact the City Clerk, Teresa Henry, at Raytown City Hall (737-6004).


RYAN MYERS
Myers Considers Forming Committee to Study
GO Bonds
Ward 3 Alderman Ryan Myers is considering the formation of a special committee to study the feasibility of issuing General Obligation (GO) Bonds to fund repair of neighborhood streets in Raytown.

After receiving a less than cordial reception to his idea of using GO Bonds to fund street repair in Raytown, Ryan Myers had thoughts of shelving the idea.

“Three of the Board members seemed to resent that I even brought up the subject up,” said Myers.

“But then I began to hear from the public,” Myers continued.

Private citizens contacted Myers and encouraged him to move forward with exploring the use of GO Bonds to upgrade neighborhood streets. As did some members of the Board of Aldermen. The Mayor threw in his two cents worth when he told Myers he thought the idea had merit and deserved more investigation.  

“I have been contacted by a number of people who are interested in serving on a committee to work toward a viable package for the voters to consider,” said Myers.

Myers said the August, 2019 election seems like a good date for the voters to consider a road maintenance package. He is also aware there is a lot of work to do before reaching that goal.

BILL VAN BUSKIRK
Ward 4 Alderman Hospitalized
Ward 4 Alderman Bill VanBuskirk was hospitalized for severe back pain last week. He had two lumbar discs removed and bone chips removed during the procedure.

Mr. VanBuskirk is expected to have a full recovery but is under doctor’s orders to cease all activity for 60 days.

The Ward 4 Alderman said, “I just need some peace and quiet for a couple of months. I will be ready to go back to work  and then I will be ready to go back to work on the Raytown Board of Aldermen”.


Paul’s Rant
Ward 4 Alderman Steve Meyers gave an interesting speech at a recent Board of Aldermen meeting. He wants to form a committee to create a new slogan for Raytown.

Guess you might call it an effort to re-brand Raytown. The last time this was done was during Mayor Sue Frank’s first term of office.

NEW LOGO
The Board back then spent a considerable amount of money creating a new logo and slogan which reads “reaching for tomorrow”.

“The slogan never really caught on,” said Greg Walters, who served on the Board of Alderman at the time. “I think most people identified it with a political faction in town.” 
OLD LOGO

Personally, I prefer the old logo. It speaks to Raytown's history.

The old logo has an image of a blacksmith with a hammer pounding on an anvil. The blacksmith’s name was William Ray. Raytown is said to be named after him. A plaque commemorating William Ray’s blacksmith shop stands at the intersection of Blue Ridge Boulevard and Raytown Road.

Historically speaking, Raytown’s history pre-dates the American Civil War. It can be traced back to 1847. Located at the confluence of the Santa Fe, Oregon and California Trails, the area was truly a jumping off spot for pioneers heading west.

For more definitive proof of the significance of the Raytown area and the trails one need only go to Cave Spring Park, located in Raytown at Gregory Boulevard and Blue Ridge Boulevard. Cave Spring has been designated a national historic site in recognition of is historical significance to the three trails.

Greg has always referred to the old logo as the “little guy with the hammer”. He is not shy about his thoughts on the old vs. the new logo.

“The problem with the new logo is that it does not speak to anything remotely related to Raytown. The old logo could be updated. Mention of the founding date of the Raytown area along with the incorporation date of the city would be a nice touch,” said Walters.

Alderman Steve Meyers recently announced he was forming a committee to take another look at Raytown’s slogan. I hope he broadens the scope of his committee to look into changing the logo back to one that has some historic significance.

BY PAUL LIVIUS
The Paul Livius Report
Raytown Board of Aldermen Meeting – December 04, 2018

Michael Keenan, City auditor discussed the pending year end Financials.  For more information to go:

The Board passed a resolution authorizing an agreement for legal services with Lauber Municipal Law, for city attorney and special counsel services and approving the expenditure of funds with Lauber Municipal Law.After a thorough review by staff, direction was given to enter into a Legal Services Agreement with Kapke & Willerth LLC. On October 24, 2018, the City received a Notice of Retirement and Termination of the City’s current Legal Services Agreement. After further review of the proposals received, it has been determined that Lauber Municipal Law, LLC meets all of the qualifications to provide Legal and Special Counsel Services to the City of Raytown beginning on January 1, 2019. There will be a transition period between Kapke & Willerth LLC and Lauber Municipal Law, LLC.

The Board passed a resolution appointing Damon l. Hodges as city administrator for the city of Raytown and ratifying an employment agreement.The Board of Aldermen previously met in closed sessions, authorized and duly noticed under the Sunshine Law, to discuss the hiring of Mr. Hodges as City Administrator. Pursuant to Board approval on December 4, 2018, a contract was approved and authorized for execution between the City and Damon Hodges to serve as City Administrator.

The Board heard the first reading of an ordinance amending chapter 36 (streets, sidewalks, and other public places), article v (facilities in public right-of-way), and adding article vi (small wireless facilities) to the code of ordinances of the city of Raytown, for the purpose of updating the city’s requirements for use of the public right-of-way and permitting of small wireless facilities. The City has previously regulated the construction and deployment of telecommunications facilities and other similar facilities through a variety of ordinances and practices. During the 2018 Legislative Session, the 101st Missouri General Assembly approved, and the Governor signed into law, House Bill 1991 with an effective date for a majority of the provisions of January 1, 2019. House Bill 1991 amended and added certain provisions to the Missouri Revised Statutes relating to the City’s authority to regulate the construction and deployment of small wireless facilities. The Federal Communications Commission did release on September 27, 2018 FCC-18-133 titled Accelerating Wireless Broadband Deployment by Removing Barriers to Infrastructure Investment, and FCC-18-133 contained both a declaratory ruling and order regarding the City’s authority to regulate the construction and deployment of small wireless facilities. Staff recommends to amend and revise the Code of Ordinances of the City of Raytown, Missouri to conform with both HB 1991 and FCC-18-133 to encourage the deployment of small wireless facilities within the City in a manner that (1) protects the right-of-way as a unique and physically limited resource critical to the travel and transportation of person and property in the City; (2) manages the right-of-way to ensure that the right-of-way remains accessible for public uses including the partial occupancy of the right-of-way by utilities and public service entities, which enhance the health, welfare, and economic well-being of the City and its citizens; (3) promotes competition, securing higher quality services for the citizens of the City and consumers at large; and (4) does not materially inhibit the provision of telecommunications services.

The Board passed a resolution approving the acceptance of a MissouriDepartment of Transportation traffic and highway safety hazardous moving grant in the amount of $6,169.05 and amending the fiscal year 2018-2019 budget. In February 2018, the Board of Aldermen approved the Raytown Police Department to apply for grant funding through the Missouri Department of Transportation’s Highway Safety Crash Reduction/ Hazardous Moving Enforcement Grant. In August 2018, the Police Department was notified of the grant award in the amount not to exceed $6169.05. The grant provides funding to be used for officers’ overtime traffic safety assignments and the purchase of an additional Stalker brand handheld radar instrument at 100 % reimbursement to the City. In addition, the grant will reimburse the cost of sending one officer to the annual LETSAC conference for additional training.

The Board passed a resolution approving an application for grant funding in connection with Raytown Volunteers in Police Service.The Raytown Volunteers in Police Service Inc. has been created to support community service and the crime prevention efforts of Raytown Police Department. Raytown Volunteers in Police Service Inc. will be providing funding to reimburse the Raytown Police Department for expenditures required to facilitate these programs in Fiscal Year 2018- 2019. The goal is to support the combined missions of the Police Department and the Corporation, which exists to improve communication and trust between the Police and the community, while reducing crime through proactive educational efforts. Once the grant is accepted by the City, eligible expenses associated with supporting the Raytown Police Department's public education and community support programs may be remitted for reimbursement, at the rate of 100%, up to twelve thousand three hundred and twenty dollars ($12,320.00). Eligible reimbursable expenses include, but are not limited to: approved overtime assignments, purchase of any new supplies, materials, equipment, contracting for printing or other services necessary to operate programs such as Citizen's Police Academy, Safety Fairs, Coffee-With-A-Cop, Community Forums, and community requests for public speaking events by members of the Police Department. There is no match required by the City for this grant. Application for funding may be submitted in written or electronic format and submitted to the Directing Board of the Corporation by the Chief of Police of the Raytown Police Department or his designee. Once approved by the Directing Board, grants require the Police Department and Finance Department to submit an accounting of expenditures to the Corporation Board. Funding will be paid to the City from Truman Heartland Community Foundation, the fund administrator. The Corporation maintains charitable funds within a sub-fund of Truman Heartland Community Foundation for the sole purpose of funding this grant process.

The Board passed a resolution approving the acceptance of a bureau of justice assistance bulletproof vest partnership grant in the amount of $9,285.24 and amending the fiscal year 2018-2019 budgetIn May 2018, the Raytown Police Department applied for a grant through the Bureau of Justice Assistance Bulletproof Vest Partnership. In October 2018, the Department was notified of the grant award in the amount not to exceed $9,285.24. The Department utilizes a vest replacement plan which will replace an officer’s uniquely fitted bulletproof vest that conforms to the individual wearer every five years as recommended by vest manufacturers. The grant will reimburse the Department for 50% of the purchase cost of National Institute of Justice compliant armored vests purchased from April 1, 2018 to August 31, 2020, or until available funds have been requested. The Department is responsible for funding the remainder of the cost of the vest and the purchase of bulletproof vests is a budgeted item for fiscal year 2018-2019.

The Board passed a resolution approving the expenditure of funds with MDL Technologyfor information technology-related services in an amount not to exceed $105,600.00 for fiscal year 2018-2019. The Police Department’s use and dependence on technology has grown exponentially over the past decade. This increase is due to changes in the law enforcement industry itself, as well as increased reliance on IT systems for conducting day to day business. These IT systems have become absolutely critical to the function of the Police Department. The Police Department’s budget included appropriation for managed services for FY2018/2019. In September 2018, the Department broadcast a request for proposal for Managed IT Services. Two (2) vendors responded with proposals. The Police Department then met with both vendors, MDL and HSMC Orizon, to discuss their proposals. During the meetings, MDL confirmed that their proposal was inclusive with no additional fees. The meeting with HSMC Orizon revealed additional significant fees that were not included in their original proposal. The company also quoted an optional service plan for off-site backup replication and retention, which the Department considers a necessity. Their proposal could not manage the amount of data the Police Department retains, nor could it replicate the data effectively. When this was brought to the attention of the vendor, they verified that their option would not work and returned with a price that more than doubled the cost per month. HSMC Orizon also verified that they will not assist with issues related to our Department website and would refer to a 3rd Party Web Service Provider. The proposal from MDL included a comparable off-site backup solution that met the capacity needs of the Department and MDL will assist with issues related to our website. A panel consisting of Police Department staff was formed to discuss the proposals. The review panel collectively recommended MDL Technologies as the IT Managed Service provider for the Police Department. While both vendors had positive aspects, MDL Technology’s proposal had components that set them apart from the other vendor. A significant factor taken into consideration was that MDL provided an inclusive bid that covered all services at a set monthly fee, which is of significant importance to the Department’s budgetary process. The other vendor’s proposal was not inclusive and would require additional fees other than what was originally proposed.

The Board passed a resolution approving a maintenance contract with MotorolaSolutions, Inc. In an amount not to exceed $31,836.00 for fiscal year 2018-2019. The Police Department utilizes the Motorola radio system during its normal course of duties. To ensure the life span of the equipment, having the manufacturer perform the maintenance will make certain the equipment has the best service available. Proper maintenance is necessary to extend the usable life of the radios. This is a recurring yearly contract between Motorola and the City of Raytown to provide maintenance and infrastructure repairs to the radio system in case of failure. Motorola, as the designer of the system, has the authority to work on our radios and is the only supplier of the parts to maintain the system. Because of these factors, Motorola is the only source that can perform the work necessary to maintain and keep our radio system functioning.


The Board passed a resolution approving an annual maintenance agreement by and between the city of Raytown and Harris Computer-Global Software in an amount not to exceed $49,746.Harris Computer-Global Software is the Records Management System and Computer Aided Dispatch system vendor. These systems were installed in 2005 and at the time of implementation included 5 years of support, which expired in 2010. The maintenance support plan is now an annual expense. This support plan is critical to the Department’s function as these systems directly affect how the department responds to calls and investigate crimes. 


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Saturday, December 1, 2018


BY GREG WALTERS
This Week’s
Raytown Report
We have turned over our lead editorial spot to Mayor Protem Ryan Myers in this week’s edition of the Raytown Report. Mr. Myers believes he has a way to re-build Raytown’s infrastructure of neighborhood streets. His plan is to make use of General Obligation Bonds (GO Bonds) to finance the plan.

It is a plan that has some merit. We urge you to take the time to read over Myers proposal.

Other News This Week . . .
Raytown’s City Marshal/Chief of Police Jim Lynch has not made any official announcement  . . . but we have been told by people close to Mr. Lynch he has giving serious thought to not running for re-election when his term expires.

One of those sources shared with us this past week that Lynch had officially terminated his re-election campaign committee with the Missouri Ethics Commission. The Missouri Ethics Commission (MEC) is where candidate financial reports are published for public viewing.

In fact, Lynch did terminate his campaign committee . . . in May of 2017.

It is our position that Raytown find a Chief of Police whom, like Mr. Lynch, is a member of our community, has connections here, and is not an outsider who simply seeks to use our town as a stepping stone in their career.

We are certain there are good candidates either within our men in blue or within our community to answer the call to serve. 

The end of this story can be written by only one man. That man is Jim Lynch. If his intention is to retire early, he should, for the sake of a smooth transition, make a public announcement to settle the question.

Other Publications Report . . .
The following story is re-printed from National Review magazine:
“There is nothing nastier than a mob. One showed up at the home of Fox news host Tucker Carlson one night while only his wife was home. The mob chanted, “We know where you sleep.” They also kicked his door.

Those people were from Antifa, which styles itself anti-fascist. They behave exactly like fascists – and more to the point of law enforcement, as criminals.”

Anyone who knows the history of the awakening of Nazi Germany in the 1930’s can see the parallels. Such behavior should not be condoned or ignored. The story does not say if anyone was arrested or prosecuted. If not, they should have.

Should Raytown “GO”
For New Infrastructure?
By Ryan Myers, Ward 3 Alderman, City of Raytown

Tuesday November 13, 2018, the Board of Aldermen voted to allow meto bring a public discussion forward regarding General Obligation (GO) Bonds as a medium to overhaul Raytown’s ailing infrastructure.

This topic went over like a lead balloon to several members of the Board.Alderman Meyers, Alderman Greene, and Alderman Moore all expressed their skepticism and criticized my idea. But to the remainder of the Board, the idea of a General Obligation (GO) Bond seemed to be an alluring case to argue.

Since our board meeting, I have been approached by multiple citizens requesting more information concerning my GO Bond presentation. Several local media publishers also reached out to me, asking if I would like a non-confrontational platform to better explain my idea and why I believe this is a viable avenue for the Raytown community to take. So let’s get started, shall we?

What is a GO Bond?
AGO Bond is a financing vehicle used by tax-levying authorities (e.g. the City, Fire District, School District, etc.) Similar to a home equity line of credit (HELOC) on a house (I’ll get to payments later), the taxing entity leverages its equity to improve its own property. In Raytown’s case, this means newstreet improvements, including storm sewers, and new street lights. Some local examples of GO Bond achievements include:

·        The new Raytown South High School football stadium (2015)
·        School District general renovations (roofs, facades, security upgrades, IT, etc.) (2014-present)
·        Raytown Fire Station(s) remodel (2004)
·        KC Pet Project facility (2018)

These above examples are a small percentage of metro-wide GO Bond projects that improve our quality of life. By this point, I’m sure you are asking who pays for it and what the catch is.

How GO Bonds Work
To make this easy I have oversimplified and broken the GO Bond mechanism down into steps:

1.   The governing body (City, Fire, Parks, etc.) vote to add a bond measure to an election.

2.   Voters either approve or turn down the bond measure. It must pass by a 2/3 or 4/7 majority, depending on when the election is held.

3.   The bond amounts are put together by a brokerage firm and put to market. Investors buy the bonds which generate the revenue to pay for only the improvements listed in the voter-approved ballot.Interest rates are fixed. Bond payments are paid through a temporary increase in property taxes.

4.   The taxing entity receives the bonds and deposits them into a segregated account. The bond monies are spent on only the ballot items approved by voters.

5.   The projects are completed and the bonds are paid off for a set amount of years. Once paid off, property taxes are lowered to their original level.

Wait, this Sounds like a TIF. Is this a TIF? 
No, Nope, Not even close. While a TIF and GO Bonds are both debt vehicles, a TIF carries significantly higher risk to the city. The revenue generated by TIF goes directly into the pocket of the developer. GO Bond revenue goes back directly into our community in the form of new infrastructure. TIF funds are generated by sales tax and overall property value increases (PILOTS and EATS). The risk assumed is dependent on whether enough sales tax revenue is generated to pay the developer. With GO Bonds, the revenue stream to pay the note is [nearly] guaranteed, as it is paid by a temporary tax levy increase to the taxpayers. Once the debt is paid, property taxes go back down.

A Local Example
I put together a few scenarios to test the waters with local voters. Keep in mind at the ballot box that the bond can only be spent on what the voters specify; nothing else. As seen in the table below, this includes a $15 million, $30 million, and $50 million GO Bond scenario:

 As you can see above:
  Option #1 is a $15 million bond, which could repave half of the roads in Raytown.
·         Option #2 is a $30 million bond, which could repave ALL of the roads in Raytown.
·         Option #3 is a $50 million bond, which could repave ALL of the roads in Raytown
       and make significant storm sewer upgrades.

Not to sound like Sarah McLachlan, but for less than $22 a month we can transform Raytown’s dilapidated roads, sewers, and/or streetlights into the pride of the metro area.

Some Final Thoughts
Raytown’s infrastructure is crumbling at an exponential rate that the city can no longer keep up with. The Raytown School District and Raytown Fire Protection District already utilize GO Bonds, which have been proven to be beneficial in sustaining their investment in our community. Additionally, the city recently received a downgraded credit rating from Standard & Poor’s. On Page 5 of the rationale distributed by S&P Global regarding Raytown’s credit downgrade, it specifically notes that a lack of new GO debt was a contributor in the credit rating downgrade.

The above examples are a prime case of, while not optimal, taking on taxpayer-backed debt could help dig Raytown out of its downward infrastructure spiral and improve the city’s credit rating. This will also help Raytown’s citizens regain trust in the elected officials at City Hall and move our city forward.

Disclaimer: This article does not necessarily reflect the overall view of the Raytown Board of Aldermen nor the City of Raytown and are considered the independent opinion of the author.



News Release
For Immediate Release
December 3, 2018

Mike McDonough Announces Bid for
Re-Election as Mayor of Raytown
Mike McDonough announced today, his intention to run for re-election for Mayor of the City of Raytown.

The election will be held April 2nd, 2019.  Mayor McDonough is dedicated to continuing to work at fostering a culture of cooperation within the City of Raytown.  He is committed to continue working alongside citizens and businesses to meet important community goals. For decades, Mike has served the public, his own neighbors, with integrity and dedication, in both public safety and local charity service, and is committed to our community's progress.

Mike, a nearly life-long Raytown resident, has achieved many accomplishments throughout his personal and professional life.  He has been honored by the Truman Heartland Foundation in 2014 as Raytown’s Outstanding Citizen of the Year.  The award recognized Mike for using his  skills, abilities, and position to promote the wellbeing of his community and the people that live in it. The award lauded Mike for his workhelping to improve and enrich the communities of Eastern Jackson County.

Mike donates time to many charitable organizations and serves on the Board of Directors for Raytown Emergency Assistance Program (REAP,) the Raytown Police Benefit Fund, Raytown Rotary Member, Raytown Masonic Lodge Member, Shriner at the Ararat Shrine, and Raytown Kiwanis club.

He remains involved with the school district in many ways as he recognizes them as an important piece in what makes this a great community. He was also involved at Southwood Elementary School for seven years in the Youth Friends Program and has been involved in other programs in the Raytown community. He is also an active member of the Raytown Chamber of Commerce and the Raytown Main Street Association.

His other accomplishments include working with youth in Scouting, coaching youth sports, and assisting other organizations with fundraising events and efforts.  He has twice received the Police Officer of the Year Award from local service organizations, a Lifesaving Award from the Metropolitan Chiefs and Sheriffs Association, the James Schneider Award from the Raytown Fire Protection District, the Life Saving Star from Raytown Emergency Medical Services, as well as several Quality Contribution Certificates from the Raytown C-2 School District.
 
Mayor McDonough continues to work with staff and elected officials to improve operations ofRaytown city government. He has shown his can-do attitude by spearheading a movementtobring long-delayed butimportant projects forward to get them completed. Those projects include:
·        The downtown streetscape;
·        The 59thStreet pedestrian sidewalk from Woodson to Raytown Central Middle School (making walking to school and the downtown Raytown area safer) and further extending into the downtown area;
·        Replacement of the 83rdStreet bridge.Mayor McDonough used his seat on the Total Transportation Policy Committee to make this $1.57 million project more affordable by leading the effort for a $600,000 grant.
·        Mayor McDonough led a collaborative effort of a diverse group of elected officials and staff to facilitate refinancing of the Tax Increment Financing (TIF) area around Walmart, Scooters, IHOP, Freddy’s, Ace Hardware and NAPA Auto Parts, resulting in an expected savings of over $2 million by decreasing the cost and term of the original TIF.
·        Mike was also instrumental in forming the Raytown Live committee to fund and host free community concerts all summer in the downtown area of Raytown, funded entirely by sponsor advertising.

Promises made and promises kept. Mayor Mike looks forward to continuing his service to the citizens of Raytown by leading the City of Raytown with a spirit of progress and looking to the future to take advantage of the Rock Island Corridor Trail coming through Raytown and the renewed interest in our downtown area that has caused.

Mayor McDonough has lived in Raytown for the past 55 years.  He grew up in Raytown, attended Raytown schools and graduated from Raytown South High School in 1973. He enjoys living in Raytown because of the great people that live there and the great sense of community. Mayor McDonough said, “The people are so giving and helpful to one another, and like me, are proud of this community. Although this town is surrounded by Kansas City, it has continued to keep its small-town feel.”

He had served as a police officer for the Raytown Police Department since 1975. Prior to that, he worked for a year in the City Street Department.  His passion has been, and will continue to be, the community of Raytown. He looks forward to continuing his service to the citizens of the City of Raytown. He has been serving his community for the last 44years.
 
It is that dedication and commitment to the Raytown community that has led Mike McDonough to decide to run for re-election to the office of Mayor of the City of Raytown.Mayor Mike would be honored to receive your vote on Election Day, April 2nd, 2019.



Sunday, November 25, 2018


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BY GREG WALTERS
New Funding
for TIF Approved
The Raytown Board of Aldermen forestalled a possible $250,000 shortfall in TIF payments at its meeting last Tuesday night.

The issue at hand was payment due bond holders of revenue bonds who underwrote the 350 Live TIF on 350 Highway. Sources at City Hall reported sales tax revenues fell approximately $250,000 short of the amount due for TIF Bonds.

The shortfall was aggravated by a balloon payment due for the current year under the old bond agreement.

At its regular meeting the Board approved the issuance of new bonds at a substantially lower rate, thereby eliminating the estimated payment due under the former bond payment schedule. For more details see the Paul Livius Report (in bold type) below.

The new agreement also relieves the city of the responsibility of guaranteeing the payment of bond indebtedness with the good faith of the city.

The city’s bond counsel, Galen DeWyre, told the Board the city will save between $600,000 and $700,000 and the bonds will be paid off 10 months early.

The Mayor has been authorized by the Board of Aldermen to enter into the agreement provide the interest rate does not go above 4.5% for the life of the bonds.

These conditions are essentially the Bonds mature on such dates with a final maturity of not later than February 1, 2031.

Paul’s Rant
We all have them, pet peeves of situations that making us want to scream in frustration. Mine is simple.

As many of you know, I regularly document meetings of the Raytown Board of Aldermen. You read them in my Paul Livius Reports. I like to think of it as a public service.

By writing the report, I save readers the tedious business of watching meetings that can sometimes drift into areas that are really not city business.

So here is my pet peeve.

Each member of the Board of Aldermen, and, each member of city staff, has their very own microphone. They also have a switch on the microphone that allows them to turn it on and off.

Every two weeks the Aldermen meeting in public session. They know the on/off switch is on the microphone. Why don’t they use it?

Even the Mayor appears to be frustrated by non-use of the equipment. At last Tuesday’s meeting he reminded everyone to use their microphones when talking.

So what is the problem?

We here at the Raytown Report are about solutions. So we are going to give our elected officials and city staff a short tutorial on how to use the microphone. We hope it works.

TUTORIAL FOR MICROPHONE USE:
1.   When speaking, turn the microphone to the “ON” position.
2.   When not speaking, turn the microphone to the “OFF” position.

So there you have it. We sincerely hope the Board and city staff take note of these user friendly, easy to follow directions.

ONE FINAL NOTE . . .
The microphones at city hall are not directional microphones as used by the NFL during football games. You actually have to speak into them. If the microphone is more than 20 inches away from your mouth, you might as well not use it because it will not pick up what you are saying.

Note to members of city staff. If the microphone is behind two rows of paper you might as well turn it off.

Like Mayor McDonough said at the end of the last meeting, “push the button so I can hear you.” 


BY PAUL LIVIUS
The Paul Livius Report
Raytown Board of Aldermen Meeting
November 20, 2018
The Board passed a resolution approving the appointment of Steve Scott and Carolyn Bradley to the Raytown Crossing Community Improvement District Board of Directors.

The Board voted to adopt an amended ordinance authorizing the issuance of Appropriation Supported Tax Increment and Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Raytown Live Redevelopment Plan – Redevelopment Project Area 1), Series 2018 of the City of Raytown, Missouri in the principal amount not to exceed $31,000,000; approving the execution and delivery of the indenture and other documents to be entered into with respect to such bonds; and authorizing certain other actions in connection with the issuance of said bonds. Galen DeWyre told the Board the city will save between $600,000 and $700,000 and the bonds will be paid off 10 months early.

The City previously issued its $39,990,000 aggregate principal amount of Annual Appropriation-Supported Tax Increment and Sales Tax Revenue Bonds (Raytown Live Redevelopment Plan – Redevelopment Project Area 1), Series 2007 for the purpose of providing funds to (1) pay for certain Redevelopment Project Costs (as defined in the Wal-Mart Redevelopment Agreement) incurred or to be incurred in connection with Redevelopment Project 1, (2) fund capitalized interest on the Series 2007 Bonds, (3) fund a debt service reserve fund for the Series 2007 Bonds, and (4) pay costs related to the issuance of the Series 2007 Bonds.

The City has determined that it is in the best interest of the City to refund all of the $31,240,000 outstanding principal amount of Series 2007 Bonds by the issuance of the City’s Annual Appropriation-Supported Tax Increment and Sales Tax Refunding Revenue Bonds (Raytown Live Redevelopment Plan – Redevelopment Project Area 1), Series 2018. The City proposes the issuance of the Bonds to provide funds to (1) refund the Refunded Bonds, (2) fund a debt service reserve fund for the Bonds and (3) pay costs related to the issuance of the Bonds pursuant to a Trust Indenture (the “Indenture”), by and between the City and UMB Bank, N.A., as Trustee (the “Trustee”). This Bond Ordinance contains parameters which authorize the Mayor to approve the bond sale under certain conditions.

These conditions are essentially the Bonds mature on such dates with a final maturity of not later than February 1, 2031 and bear and pay interest at such rates and on such dates with a true interest cost of not more than 4.50%. The Bonds and the interest thereon shall be special, limited obligations of the City payable solely from the Pledged Revenues and moneys in the funds and accounts held by the Trustee, and shall be secured by a transfer, pledge and assignment of and a grant of a security interest in the Trust Estate to the Trustee and in favor of the owners of the Bonds.

The Bonds and interest thereon shall not be deemed to constitute a debt or liability of the City within the meaning of any constitutional, statutory or charter limitation or provision, and shall not constitute a pledge of the full faith and credit of the City but shall be payable solely from the funds provided for in the Indenture. The issuance of the Bonds shall not, directly, indirectly or contingently, obligate the City to levy any form of taxation therefor or to make any appropriation for their payment.

The Board agreed to a change in zoning for property located at 6920 Elm.  Antonio Mendez, on behalf of Dharmony Life Series 6 LLC., is requesting to rezone the lot located at 6920 Elm Street from Highway Commercial (HC) to High-Density Residential (R-3). The applicant is requesting the rezoning to allow for a 6-unit townhome development which would not be an acceptable land use in a HC zoning district. The building on the site was severely damaged in a fire in March of 2018. Since then, the building has sat in disrepair. According to business license records, the building had a long history of being a hair and nail salon for much of the 2000’s and into the early 2010’s. More recently, there had not been any licensed businesses with the City at the address. It should be noted that this property is also within the Highway 350 Design Corridor, which means it will have to follow additional regulations that are intended to encourage high quality architecture, site planning, lighting, landscaping, screening, signage, infrastructure planning, and traffic flow.

The Board voted to table indefinitely an ordinance granting approval of the site plan for land located at 6920 Elm. Antonio Mendez, on behalf of DHARMONY LIFE SERIES 6 LLC., is requesting to rezone the lot located at 6920 Elm Street from Highway Commercial (HC) to High-Density Residential (R-3). The applicant is requesting the rezoning to allow for a 6-unit townhome development which would not be an acceptable land use in a HC zoning district. The building on the site was severely damaged in a fire in March of 2018. Since then, the building has sat in disrepair. According to business license records, the building had a long history of being a hair and nail salon for much of the 2000’s and into the early 2010’s. More recently, there had not been any licensed businesses with the city at the address. It should be noted that this property is also within the Highway 350 Design Corridor, which means it will have to follow additional regulations that are intended to encourage high-quality architecture, site planning, lighting, landscaping, screening, signage, infrastructure planning, and traffic flow.

The Board voted to approve an ordinance granting an amendment to a planned development to allow for a 10-bed memory care facility on lot 6 of Blue Ridge Villas.  Ivan Chiang, on behalf of LIY Financial LLC., is requesting to amend a planned development overlay district, Blue Ridge Villas, located at 59th Street and Hunter Court. The planned development was approved by the Board of Aldermen in January 2006. To date, 27 of the 34 lots remain vacant. Blue Ridge Villas is surrounded by residential uses. The applicant is requesting to amend the planned development to allow for a 10-bed memory care facility on Lot 6. Earlier this year, a 10-unit assisted living facility was approved by the Board of Aldermen on Lot 5.

The Board voted to approve an ordinance approving the final site plan of Somerset Village apartments, Wilson view.  Curtis Peterson, on behalf of KM-TEH Realty owners of the property located at 9811/9813 E 60th Street is requesting approval of site plan in order to replace the building that burnt down. The building that was destroyed contained 11 dwelling units and proposed replacement building also contains 11 dwelling units. Somerset Village is a complex of 13 buildings that have 156 dwelling units. The complex is located on East 60th Street just west of Raytown Road. The building that was destroyed by fire in February 2016 is located at 9811 E. 60th Street.

The owner of Somerset Village is requesting site plan approval to reconstruct the building that burned down. The building that was destroyed contained 11 dwelling units and the proposed replacement building also contains 11 dwelling units. Somerset Village is a complex of 13 buildings located on E 60th Street just west of Raytown Road. (Exhibit 1) The building at 9811 E. 60th Street (Exhibit 2) was destroyed in a fire in February 2016.

The Board voted to approve an ordinance approving the final plat, Wilson view.
Curtis Petersen, on behalf of KM-TEH Realty owners of the property located at 9811/9813 E 60th Street is requesting approval of a final plat in order to replace the building that burnt down. Wilson View, known as Somerset Village, has been at this location for approximately 60 years. There are 19 lots throughout the property with multiple buildings over lapping the lot lines. Staff where informed by Jackson County GIS personnel that the only data they have before 1999 is notes in the system and three tax parcels do not have any notes. Additionally, in researching the deeds, every time the property transferred hands the legal description is simply lot 1-19, which is the development. Somerset Village is a complex of 13 buildings that have 156 dwelling units. The complex is located on East 60th Street just west of Raytown Road. The building that was destroyed is located 9811 E. 60th Street and was destroyed by fire in February 2016. The City does not have building permit information available, but sewer connection records indicate it was built in 1965 along with two other buildings on the cul-de-sac. The rest of the complex was built in the mid-seventies.

The Board heard the second reading of an ordinance establishing the compensation for the office of Board of Aldermen for the term beginning April 2019. Alderman Mark Moore made a motion to amend the ordinance to reduce the compensation for Alderman to $200 per month, with a $25 per month car allowance.  Alderman Bill Van Buskirk said it would be almost impossible to attract dedicated people to the alderman position if they cut the pay.  Besides, he has spent many nights talking with constitutes instead of eating his dinner.  The idea of cutting the salary is ludicrous.  Alderman Jim Aziere said the aldermen have to justify to their spouses why they want to run again, especially if the salary is cut in half.  Alderman Steve Meyers said salary doesn’t make a good public servant.  He pointed to the Raytown School Board.

He said they work hard, long hours and receive no pay at all.  He supports Alderman Moore’s motion to reduce the Aldermen salary.  The Board failed to passed the amendment, and passed the original ordinance. The Elected Officials Compensation Committee was established by the Board of Aldermen to review the compensation for elected officials and make recommendations for adjustment. An elected official’s compensation must be set prior to a person taking office and compensation cannot change during the term of office, unless additional duties are added. Accordingly, any adjustment the Board of Aldermen deems appropriate must be made prior to the April 2, 2019 election. The recommendation of the Commission relative to the Board of Aldermen was to keep the monthly compensation at the current rate of $400.00 per month and to keep the monthly car allowance at the current rate of $50.00 per month.

The Board heard the secondreading of an ordinance setting the compensation for the City Collector beginning in April 2019.  Alderman Ryan Myers moved the salary for the City Collector salary be reduced to $1 per month and the term be reduced to two years.  The Board passed the amendment.  Alderman Ryan Myers asked the city staff to look at merging the office of city collector with the office of City Marshall.  This amendment also passed.  The Elected Officials Compensation Committee was established by the Board of Aldermen to review the compensation for elected officials and make recommendations for adjustment.
 An elected official’s compensation must be set prior to a person taking office and compensation cannot change during the term of office, unless additional duties are added. Accordingly, any adjustment the Board of Aldermen deems appropriate must be made prior to the April 2, 2019 election. The recommendation of the Commission relative to the City Collector was to keep the monthly compensation at the current rate of $100.00 per month.

The Board passed the ordinance setting the compensation for the Office of Mayor beginning in April 2019.  The Elected Officials Compensation Committee was established by the Board of Aldermen to review the compensation for elected officials and make recommendations for adjustment. An elected official’s compensation must be set prior to a person taking office and compensation cannot change during the term of office, unless additional duties are added. Accordingly, any adjustment the Board of Aldermen deems appropriate must be made prior to the April 2, 2019 election. The recommendation of the Commission relative to the Mayor was to keep the monthly compensation at the current rate of $1,000.00 per month and current monthly car allowance at $200.00 per month.

The Board passed an ordinance amending chapter 2, article iii, officers and employees.With the addition of the Assistant City Administrator (Chapter 2, Article III, Division 2B) to the Raytown Municipal Code, it became apparent that although the City went through a recodification process in 2013, there are still Chapters which are in need of updating. Many of the positions in Chapter 2 are written according to Statute; however, many were written and have not been updated since the City of Raytown hired their first City Administrator in 1994. The language changes do not conflict with State Statute and the updates are consistent with the day-to-day operations of the City at this time. Additionally, due to changes in the City of Raytown Personnel Manual and the City’s Purchasing Policy, some sections have been removed. Alderman Bonnaye Mims stated she didn’t see a need for an ordinance to be sponsored.  If the staff needs an ordinance, they should be able to put it on the agenda without finding a board member to sponsor it.Aldermen Bill Van Buskirk said we used to have to find an alderman to sponsor an ordinance, but with the creation of the oversight committees, there’s no longer a need for the aldermen to review an ordinance before it appeared on the agenda.

The Board passed an ordinance adopting the Missouri Record Retention Manual with current Missouri Revised State Statutes updated August 2018 and as amended from time-to-time.  The City of Raytown, Missouri has not updated its Municipal Records Manual since June 7, 2011. In order to be compliant with all current Missouri Revised State Statutes regarding records retention, it is Staff’s opinion that the information attached, be adopted and as amended from time to time. The last update from the State of Missouri on this information was August 2018.

The Board passed an ordinance amending chapter 2, article vi, division 1, section 2-433 through section 2-555 of the RaytownMunicipal Code relating to meetingswhich will align the City of Raytown, Missouri Open Records Ordinance with Missouri Revised State Statute Chapter 610 in its current form and as amended from time to time.

The Board heard the first and second reading of an ordinance and then passed the ordinance authorizing the city administrator to enter into an Intergovernmental Transfer of Public Funds Agreement provides for the transfer of funds to the Missouri Department of Social Services, Mo HeathNet Division from the Ground Emergency Medical Transportation Provider for the uncompensated Medicaid cost associated with ground emergency medical transportation services. Additionally, the Administration Fee Agreement allows for a fee to be assessed on the total amount of the non-federal share of the Intergovernmental Transfer pursuant to the Intergovernmental Transfer of Public Funds Agreement.

The Board passed a resolution authorizing and approving an agreement with CGI Communications. CGI Communications works closely with the United States Conference of Mayors and the National League of Cities. Through these partnerships, CGI is able to provide a myriad of digital marketing tools to showcase and promote individual municipalities nationwide at NO Cost to the municipalities. CGI has selected the City of Raytown to be a participant in their Community Showcase Program.

CGI’s Responsibilities:
• Assume all costs for the Community Video Program • Be solely responsible for sponsorship fulfillment including all related aspects of marketing, production, printing, and distribution • Provide script writing and video content consultation • Provide all aspects of video production and editing, from raw footage to final video including professional voiceovers and background music • Provide one Community Organizations chapter to promote charities, nonprofits and community development organizations • Feature business sponsors around the perimeter of video panels.

City’s Responsibilities:
• Provide a letter of introduction for the program on City’s letterhead • Assist with the content and script for the Community Video Program • Grant CGI the right to use City’s name in connection with the preparation, production, and marketing of the Program • Display the “Coming Soon” graphic link prominently on the www.raytown.mo.us homepage within 10 business days of receipt of HTML source code • Display the “Community Video Program” link prominently on its www.raytown.mo.us homepage, including any alternate versions of your home page, for viewer access on different devices for the entire term of this agreement • Ensure that this agreement remains valid and in force until the agreed upon expiration date, regardless of change in administration • Grant full and exclusive streaming video rights for CGI and its subsidiaries, affiliates, successors and assigns to stream all video content produced by CGI for the Community Video Program • Agree that the town will not knowingly submit any photograph, video, or other content that infringes on any third party’s copyright, trademark or other intellectual property, privacy or publicity right for use in any video or other display comprising this program.

Alderman Steve Meyers told the Board the committee worked on rebranding the City’s slogan, “Reaching for Tomorrow”.   The committee couldn’t reach a consensus, so the committee was disbanded.  He would like to form a new committee and find a slogan that shows the positive energy in Raytown.  He has several community members in mind for the committee.  He asked the board for permission to start the committee working on the project. The Board voted to move forward with the committee.



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